Now is the time when nurseries are propagating plants for the upcoming spring season.

Odd looking plants with too many shoots or buds could be infected with the pathogenic bacterium Rhodococcus fascians. Propagators should be alert for symptoms, as shown in the gallery below, and have suspicious plants tested for the presence of the bacteria. This is NOT a disease to have in your greenhouse. For more information: Greenhouse Plants, Ornamental-Shoot Proliferation and Leafy Gall

Basal stem gall on Leucanthemum

Basal stem gall on Leucanthemum ‘Broadway Lights’

A hidden leafy gall on a Monarda plug.

A hidden leafy gall on a Monarda plug.

Young Rhus plant

Woody plants are susceptible as well, as shown on this young Rhus plant.

Leafy gall on a Buddleia stem.

Leafy gall on a Buddleia stem.

Aruncus leaf with small leafy gall

Galls generally occur at the base of the plant, but not always, as with this Aruncus leaf, which has a small leafy gall emerging from it.

Veronica species are particularly susceptible to Rhodococcus.

Veronica species are particularly susceptible to Rhodococcus.

Veronica ‘Royal Candles’

Veronica ‘Royal Candles’.

Veronica ‘Sunny Border Blue’

Veronica ‘Sunny Border Blue’.

Succulents are susceptible as well, as with this Sedum.

Succulents are susceptible as well, as with this Sedum.